Crescent Arts Centre, Cube Theatre
28th March: 7.30pm – 9.00pm

In this talk Ruth Dudley Edwards argues that partition might have been averted had it not been for the 1916 rebellion and what followed.

Ruth believes that had constitutional nationalists attempted to woo unionists rather than lay claim to their territory, a united Ireland had a chance of coming about. But what embedded partition in the psyche of Northern Ireland was the murderous republican violence over three decades and the campaign of hate that accompanied it and still goes on under the surface.

Ruth was born and brought up in Dublin, was a student at University College Dublin, a post-graduate at Cambridge University and now lives in London. A historian and prize-winning biographer (the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for Victor Gollancz: a biography), her recent non-fiction books include True Brits: inside the Foreign Office, The Pursuit of Reason: The Economist 1843-1993, The Faithful Tribe: an intimate portrait of the loyal institutions (shortlisted for the Channel 4 political book prize), Newspapermen: Hugh Cudlipp, Cecil Harmsworth King and the glory days of Fleet Street, Aftermath: the Omagh bombings and the families pursuit of justice (shortlisted for the Christopher Ewart-Biggs Memorial Prize and winner of the Crime Writers’ Association Gold Dagger for Non-Fiction) and The Seven: the lives and legacies of the founding fathers of the Irish Republic (shortlisted for the Orwell Prize).

Since 1993 Ruth has written for almost every national newspaper in the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom and appears frequently on radio and television. Ruth describes herself as British-Irish and is comfortable with being culturally both Irish and English.

date & time

date & time

Thurs. 28th March
7.30pm-9.00pm
venue

venue

Crescent Arts Centre Cube Theatre, 2-4 University Road, BT7 1NH
admission

admission

Tickets £5/£3

venue location

Image: DFArchives/CC BY-NC-ND 2.0/graded