Towards a smaller, fairer global economy

Towards a smaller, fairer global economy
This ‘conversational seminar’ will focus on ways in which the pervasive way of ‘doing economy’ globally might be changed for the good of people and planet.

WEDNESDAY 20TH MARCH

10:30AM – 12:30PM

Room OG/074, Peter Froggatt Centre, Queen’s University Belfast

FREE ADMISSION

These are powerful times of global ‘polycrisis’ when adverse effects of the climatic and ecological emergencies are being experienced more frequently and fiercely. Inequalities between the materially rich and poor – both within and across countries – are growing, and the sustainability of live-giving planetary systems is being damaged severely.

Underlying the disturbing and increasingly destructive ecological crises is a pervasive and powerful economic paradigm – a way of thinking that is fixated on perpetual material growth and the promotion of materialistic and individualistic concepts of prosperity.

What is to be done in response to a global economic system that is detrimental to the wellbeing of very many human beings and to the fragile ecology of the planet? In what ways might it be possible to bring about transformative systemic change to ways of ‘doing economy’ that could stave off ecological breakdown and bring us into a safer space for people and planet?

This ‘conversational seminar’ will focus on these sorts of questions. The conversation will be informed and stimulated by a presentation by Anne Ryan, a leading member of the Foundation for the Economics of Sustainability, Feasta, and author of Enough is Plenty. In sharing her perspectives on a smaller, fairer global economy, Anne will put forward some ideas and proposals for system-change, with a special focus on Cap and Share, Feasta’s framework for phasing out the use of fossil fuels in a fair way.

You are invited to bring your imagination and experience to a constructive engagement with some crucially important issues in café style conversation with fellow citizens.

The event will be hosted by Denis Stewart, a member of the International Futures Forum and active participant in the work of the South Belfast Eco-Quakers, with support from the QUB Centre for Sustainability, Equality and Climate Action (SECA).

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